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SONS OF THE SPHINX: Love or Destiny? Meet Cheryl Carpinello to find out #YA #Paranormal #awardwinning #newreads

It’s been a while since we’ve had a guest, but today we have the lovely Cheryl Carpinello, the creative mind behind SONS OF THE SPHINX, 2014 Literary Classics Silver Medal winner Preteen/YA. Plus, she’s offer to give two random commenters an e-copy of her TUTANKHAMEN SPEAKS. So don’t be shy, share your favorite read as a kid, the one that still makes you smile, and your email, and you could be one of our winners! 

For me? Ohhh…Anne McCafferty’s Dragonriders of Pern (White Dragon) or even before that, Trixie Belden…

Without further ado, I give you Cheryl Carpinello…

If you were to hold a dinner party for six, who would you invite and share at least one question you would have for each.

My first guest would be Walt Disney. I would like to ask him how he ever came up with the idea of Disneyland and all of the rides. I would also ask him if he aware that he was creating such a magical world for kids and adults!

My second guest would be Plato. My question to him: Did you really visit Atlantis, and if so, would you tell me where it’s location was?

My third guest would be Bond, James Bond! I would like to ask him what has happened to all the Bond Girls he discarded. I would also ask him how one goes about getting to be a Bond Girl.

My fourth guest would be Elvis Presley. I would ask him to sing one song to me—“I Can’t Help Falling in Love With You.”

My fifth guest would be JRR Tolkien. My questions would be how did he come up with the different characters in The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. I would also like to know how much his homeland of England contributed to his setting.

My sixth guest would be a double with Christopher Robin and Pooh. My question: Just how much fun was the 100-Acre Wood?

As children we tend to have an idea of what we want to be by the time we’re ten. What did you want to be? 

I always wanted to be a teacher. I remember playing school in my bedroom. I would line up all my stuffed animals and dolls on the bed. Then I would pass out papers and books. It was later in life that I found the stories in my head that I write about now.

Many writers have that first novel which will never see the light of day. Out of curiosity, do you have one stashed somewhere?

Yes, I do. I was probably about 30, and I had been reading Harlequin Romances. I decided that I would try and write one. The title is Castles in the Sky. It is about a female war correspondent who sees her husband die in Beruit. She retreats to the Colorado Rockies and there, true to Harlequin themes, finds her next love.

What’s the one genre you won’t ever try and why?

That would be erotica. I can’t read it and really don’t want to. I know I can’t write it.

Now because Cheryl agreed to come visit, even she can’t escape our Bullet List. Ready? 1…2…3…go!

Blades, guns, fists, or feet?

Guns. I watched a lot of Westerns growing up at home.

Favorite Fairy Tale of all time?

Sleeping Beauty. It sounded so romantic.

Three titles/authors sitting on your nightstand waiting to be read.

Twenty Years After by Alexandre Dumas

The Nile by Toby Wilkinson

The Shadow of Camelot by Wendy Leighton-Porter

Greatest one-liner of all time?

Sept. 19, 2014. After driving around the UK for 3 weeks on the wrong (sorry those of you who live there) side of the road and wondering why my husband and I were still alive every night, the day we drive back to London I say to him, “I think I could even drive in London!”

Sarcastic witticism, Southern sweetness, or Geeky disdain?

Sarcastic witticism

Strangest item currently taking up space in your writing cave?

Toys, toys, and more toys belonging to our two grandsons, 6 and 1 1/2.

Favorite supernatural creature?

A dragon like Pete’s Dragon.

Now that we have you glued to your seat, ready to see why Cheryl’s story won the 2014 Literary Classics Silver Award?

Sons of the Sphinx, a time travel adventure 

SONS OF THE SPHINX_front

Armed with what she considers her grandmother’s curse, 15-year-old Rosa agrees to help the ghost of King Tut find his lost queen Hesena. Though Hesena’s ba inhabits part of Rosa, finding the whole spirit of Hesena so that she and Tut can be together for the first time in over 3300 years proves to be a harder task than Rosa first thinks. Thrust back into Ancient Egypt with Tut, Rosa discovers that finding Hesena is not all she must do. She must keep out of the reach of the living Horemheb—who crosses mortal boundaries using Seth’s evil magic—if she is to stay alive to make it back home.

Sons of the Sphinx Buy Links:

Amazon                Smashwords              Nook               iBookstore

Author Links

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Facebook 

GoodReads 

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Author Sites

         Beyond Today Educator

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Other Books by Cheryl Carpinello

Guinevere: On the Eve of Legend – Amazon http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0025KUJ36

Young Knights of the Round Table: The King’s Ransom – MuseItUp Publishing book page: http://museituppublishing.com/bookstore/index.php/museityoung/action-adventure/the-king-s-ransom-detail 

Tutankhamen Speaks – Amazon http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00E18KH46

 Author Picture 300dpi copy

Author Bio

I love the Ancient and Medieval Worlds! As a retired English teacher, I hope to inspire young readers to read more through my Quest Books. Please follow me on this adventure. Hook up with me on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Goodreads, and Google.

Also please visit my other sites: Carpinello’s Writing Pages where I interview childrens/MG/Tween/YA authors; my home website Beyond Today Educator, and The Quest Books where I’ve teamed up with Fiona Ingram from South Africa and Wendy Leighton-Porter of England/France/Abu Dhabi to enable readers to find all of our Ancient and Medieval quest books in one place.

 Don’t forget to leave your name, email, and which book was your favorite as a kid in our comments, because you know you want a copy of Cheryl’s Tutankhamen Speaks!

A Short Writing Piece of Sorts

Anne-Marie Humphrey stood with her back stiff, but not because she was inclined to the sort of personality of someone who often stood stiff-backed at a ball. No, she stood in such an uncomfortable way because her mother had fastened her newest corset so tightly that she hardly had room to breathe, no less, slouch, as she was most accustom to.

“The Earl has arrived,” her friend, Miss Lynn Connerly, whispered, clenching her arm.

Anne-Marie wanted to leave in that very moment. Earl Randal Susset had been her betrothed. He’d dashed her heart by leaving with nothing more than a letter, on fine stationary, scribbled with I’m sorry.

If not for him, she wouldn’t have been in such a poor state of mind those six years ago. She wouldn’t have allowed Lord Agathes to court her, nor would she have been bitten by the man. Which in the end, destroyed any chance at marriage. She couldn’t, after all, hide her vamperic state from a husband. And so, she’d accepted her life as a spinster, hoping to never again set eyes on the man who’d changed her life forever.

Miss Connerly dug her nails into Anne-Marie’s arm, and then, if things weren’t bad enough, pointed. “How dare he come here! He must have known you would be in attendance, and that his sudden appearance would remind everyone of your shame.”

“Which stands to reason the man hoped to embarrass me.”

Despite all the reasons she didn’t want to look, Anne-Marie’s gaze went to the entrance hall of The Looder’s ballroom. Her gut clenched. Randal hadn’t changed a bit. A masculine energy radiated from his strong body, even from across the room. His face, dusted with the beginnings of a beard, and his almost unruly dark hair, remained at odds with his suit, the latest in fashion.

Admiring girls swarmed him, completely forgetting all social decorum in their attempt at winning the young, wealthy, and socially powerful man’s attention. To Anne-Marie’s complete embarrassment, heat gathered at the back of her eyes.

“I think I’ll go outside for some fresh air.”

“Are you sure? Everyone will be watching you.”

Anne-Marie pried herself free of her friend’s grip. “I’m sure.” But before she could turn to flee, The Earl’s gaze fell on her from across the room.

Randal’s heart bled. The woman who’d haunted his dreams for six lonely years stared back at him with pain, and then, hate in her eyes. Damn it! Why couldn’t he have slunk into town, taken care of his business, and left? Because he had to see her? Now such a thing seemed ridiculously cruel. For both of them.

She wore a scarlet dress in the latest fashion, with a small bustle, and a low neckline. The dress hugged the generous curves of her body, in such contrast with the sea of petite women flocking around him. Her long, dark hair laid in soft curls down one shoulder, drawing attention to the long lines of her neck.

The woman was every bit the siren now as she had been those years ago, stealing his heart where every other woman had failed. Her powerful allure alone should have sent him racing away from her. But even as he told himself this, smiling, nodding, and making small chat with the girls around him, he was slowly making his way towards her.

Inhaling deeply, he tried to pick up her scent, vanilla and something spicy, but there were too many people between her and him. He saw her trying to flee. A young man stepped between her and her exit, and a wave of gratefulness followed by jealousy swept through him.

Randal closed in on her, inhaling again. This time her delicious scent made his steps falter. Vanilla and spice and… he frowned, inhaling again. He knew that scent. But such a thing was impossible, Anne-Marie was many things, but not a vampire. At least not the last time he saw her.

A dangerous anger rushed through him as she escaped out of the ballroom. He’d run from her to keep her safe. And what did she do? Take a vampire as a lover? Have him change her? There was no other explanation, but he’d be damned if he didn’t find out who the rake was.

Randal sensed his fangs growing with his anger as he all but raced after her. Whoever it was, he would pay.

To be continued…

Waving the White Flag

whiteflag

Around this time of year I become the Tasmanian Devil. Zipping around like a whirling dervish, I try to meet the seemingly endless holiday demands. Battles need to be had with mobs at the grocery store. The house needs a spit shine because friends and family are descending. Gift shopping needs to get done. Food needs to be prepared. Undoubtedly, I’ll have to tear apart the newly cleaned house trying to locate Grandma’s handwritten sweet potato casserole recipe.

There are holiday parties, potlucks, and birthday celebrations to plan and attend. On top of this, someone in my house invariably gets sick. This Thanksgiving my son came down with a bad cold while my husband ended up with the flu.

The end result is that my carefully structured writing schedule goes out the window. I know I’m not alone in this. The holidays have a negative impact on the productivity of many writers.

In the past, I’ve fought back by sacrificing sleep to regain my writing time. Unfortunately, I usually end up looking and acting like the zombies in my novels. Stumbling through my son’s second Christmas wasn’t a proud moment.

So this year, I’m waving the white flag. The holiday madness wins. The word count loses. But come January, game on! I’ll be making up for lost time.

Do you have any strategies for writing through the craziness of the holidays?

If you get a chance, check out the latest blog post on my website (www.tararane.com).

Tying Up Loose Ends

As I’m doing (hopefully my final) edits on my current book, I’m noticing that one of my major issues is that I’ve left some loose ends. I’ve been so focused on the entire series, I think I forgot how frustrating it is to be a reader, and have the author leave too many unanswered questions.

But I think the worst part is that I honestly thought I had answered the questions! When I am too close to a book, I sometimes have trouble figuring out what actually got onto the paper, versus, what’s just in my head.

One example:
My main character has a lot of questions about her family history. As she progresses through the book, she learns a lot of things, but not enough. A couple of my readers were frustrated at the build up, and then the let down.

This feedback left me discouraged. “But I explained it all right… well… it’s here somewhere.” But it wasn’t. I didn’t plan on giving everything away, however, I certainly don’t want my readers feeling like I gypped them.

So then, there is the matter of fixing it. I thought, perhaps, it would be a complicated mess. That maybe as I tried to incorporate this information, it’d be like pulling on a loose thread and watching it all unravel. But so far, it has gone better than expected. By adding to a couple of conversations, and weaving a little information in, I think I’ve fixed the problem.

But editing is a tireless job. There is always more to do.

Sometimes I think if I just mapped things out in excruciating detail, I wouldn’t have to spend so much time editing. However, I also think there wouldn’t be much fun in writing a book when all the “magic” is gone.

How do you write? Do you just write and worry about the editing later? Or do plot it and sail through your editing?

When Setting Comes Alive

Everyone can probably recall a book where the setting came alive for them, when the setting moves beyond words on a page and becomes its own three dimensional character. Old Man and the Sea is the first to jump into my mind.

Recently, I attended a workshop by Erin Quinn where she taught how to bring setting alive through characters. It was one of my favorite classes, possibly because it is an area I have been focusing on lately.

One exercise she demonstrated for us, involved describing a beach. She showed a picture of a beach scene from a balcony. Below the picture was a description of a beautiful beach on the morning of a wedding. Bliss and hope rang through each sentence. The next picture of the same beach had a completely different description below. It haunted us with scavengers and lost chances. It was the exact beach. And while some of the word choices were the same, many of the verbs differed and evoked strong emotion.

As we look through our characters’ eyes, the picture changes. We need to step away from the omniscient point of view and come in closer, bringing life and emotion to our surroundings, to describe the scene as only our character could capture it.

In considering an example, I’m chose the Hunger Games trilogy (because it is currently well known). We learn in book one, from Katniss’s POV how opulent the victors’ homes are. It is something Katniss and her family could never dream of moving into on their own. But when Effie arrives in book two, how would she describe them? If you watch the movie, Catching Fire, the disgust on her face is obvious.

My current work in progress is a rotating third person POV. So I constantly have to ask myself: is this my description (as the omniscient author) or is it how my character would describe it?

Below is a picture of a house. One exercise Erin Quinn had us try was to describe this house from different characters POV. You can use your own characters in your current work in progress or try some of these out: a Russian sleeper spy, a rich reality star, and a homeless man. Watch  your setting evolve, as you evoke emotion through the a character’s point of view.

house

On writing Fast

Near the end of last week’s blog post, I alluded to the fact that you should be writing 1000 words an hour, and I stand behind that number. In fact, I double it, fold my arms, and stare you down into your side of the room because of my moral superiority.

2000 words an hour? That’s right, and you could technically do more if you put your mind to it. Or don’t put your mind to it, but I’m getting ahead of myself.

I’m a busy man. I work for a living, IT, which frequently involves off-hour work, on-call schedules, patching, and myriad of other things. 60 hour work weeks are pretty normal. I have a wife. I have children, with lots of homework each night. I enjoy playing video games. I have a couple of my favorite shows I can’t miss, you know—normal person stuff. I don’t have a lot of time for writing each day, so I have to make the most of what time I do have.

My daughter, 16, is also doing NaNoWriMo with me this year. On weekends when we finally have some time to write together, she comments that I type quickly.

I asked her how fast she typed. Being of a generation that doesn’t take typing classes in school, she had never figured it out, so I challenged her. We found an online typing test and we took the test at the same time. She was around 60 words a minute, I came in a little higher at 70, but for the sake of this argument, let’s stick with 60 wpm.

I told her 60 wpm means if you typed for a solid hour with no breaks, you could reach 3600 words.

I usually write in 45 minute sprints then take 15 minutes to get a drink, take a short walk, refocus my eyes and what not. (You should be taking breaks from the computer).

60 wpm times 45 minutes is 2700 words per hour. See? 2000 words an hour, easily.

“But Tom!” You say.

And I fold my arms even harder and glare at you.

I know, I know. It’s hard to write at one word per second for a solid hour. I get it. It’s not impossible though.

There are three major things I do to help:

1. Plan ahead. Do some outlining, even if it’s a single paragraph telling you what will happen to the character that chapter. Something so you know where you are going with your story when sit down. I personally outline more than that, usually 3 paragraphs per chapter, and I also read the outline each day before I sit down to write so I know where I’m going today.

2. Re-read what you wrote the day before. This is something new I’ve done recently. It gets you focused on where your immediate story has been, so your mind is in the zone for what you need to write right now.

Advanced tip: take notes on a separate piece of paper, note issues you have or anything you already know you want to change. When you start writing you’ll keep the revised notes in your head and you can write like you had already edited the previous day’s content.

3. Write non-stop. This is the tough part, I know, but it is possible. Remember when I said don’t put your mind to it? That’s one of the tricks here. Fix it all in editing phase. Treat your daily writing sprint like it’s NaNoWriMo. Spew the words down on the page, you can always fix it later.

So does this work all the time?

Of course not. But I can get over 1000 words an hour most days. 2000 a couple times a week. I’ve even hit 3800 one time when I was really ‘in the zone’.

I have days where each word is a struggle too, where I’m lucky to hit 200 words. I will blog about tricks to get yourself writing next week.

The point of all this rambling math was to put words per hour into perspective. We all type much faster than we need to because our brains rarely keep up with our fingers. It’s important to realize that, if you turn off your internal editor and just let your fingers do the typing, it’s quite possible to attain 2000 in an hour.

For now though, I should be writing because *ahem* I’m behind on my NaNoWriMo word count for the month.

NaNoWriMo & Infidelity

 

peeking

Since I bashed NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month) last week, it’s only fair to write a positive post.

First, a confession. Up until my first NaNoWriMo, I suffered from a crippling affliction that many authors share—story infidelity.

I’m ashamed to admit that my writing process would invariably unfold the same way. Initially, I’d be super excited about a book concept. For weeks, I’d do nothing but worldbuild. Then I’d develop my characters and their backstories to the point that they felt like real people. I’d even have conversations with them (it’s one of many traits shared by writers and the mentally ill).

After all this prep, I’d gleefully skip to my computer, sit down, and write. And write. And write. Until I got to the 40% mark in my book. At that point, I’d slam into a brick wall. Writing stopped being fun… It became work.

My characters would start to annoy me. They were no longer exciting and compelling. I knew exactly where they were going and I didn’t care if they got there any more.

Suddenly, I’d find any excuse not to write. There would be an irresistible need to watch videos of cats falling on toddlers for hours…

Then, a new book concept would come to me. It would be so much sexier than the first idea. It boasted that it was a best-seller and spoke in an thick european accent that sent goosebumps across my skin.

I’d try to resist.

I must finish the first book, I’d tell myself. So what if sitting down to write it is as fun as getting a root canal. How can I be an author if I don’t finish this book?

But the characters from the second book would invade my dreams. They’d whisper their backstories to me while I was working on scenes from my first book. They’d flash me an enticing glimpse of their world. Soon, I’d fantasize about them and their exciting story arcs.

Not too long after that, I’d give into temptation. I’d shelve the first book and start worldbuilding the new story.

Rinse and repeat.

By the time I accepted my first NaNoWriMo challenge, my hard drive was filled with dozens of partially written manuscripts.

NaNoWriMo changed all that.

The rules of NaNoWriMo are simple. You must write 50,000 words in a novel or fail.

So that November, I sat my butt down in the chair and wrote. As anticipated, a brand new story idea started whispering seductively in my ear in mid-November. But this time, I couldn’t afford to be distracted. I refused to answer the phone. I ignored it’s texts. And when it invaded my dreams, I jotted down a few notes, and told it I’d get back to it later. Then I re-focused and kept writing.

Something really strange happened after I did that.

The story I was writing became interesting again. The magic and excitement swung back like a boomerang. And I finished.

Even though that NaNoWriMo novel may never see the light of day (see my earlier post), I finally learned how to write through the temptation. I was able to finished the next book. And the next.

NaNoWriMo cured me of my story infidelity and I’ll be forever grateful.

For a laugh check out Chuck Wendig’s blog for some off color NaNoWriMo tips (staying faithful to the story is number #9 on his list).

If you have time, check out my blog post on my recent interaction with an angsty fox.

 

A Life of Editing

Some people love their first-draft. Others hate it. Some people live for their second-draft, where they can sprinkle in all the “good” stuff (now that the foundation is done).

I’m definitely a first-draft kind of girl. I love the excitement of creating characters and a world, of putting the things in my head down on paper. It’s like falling in love, where the object of my affection can do no wrong.

Editing is when reality sets in. Where my perfect story transforms into a flaw-riddled disappointment.

Unfortunately, right now, I’m working on my billionth draft of my current novel. The ulcer-inducing editing process that involves tearing apart sentences, paragraphs, and chapters that I’d once loved.

I had my “finished” book in my hands a couple months ago and sent it off to some of the members in my writing group. Since then, I’ve been waiting, feeling like I’m sitting on a giant ant pile, working on blurbs and book covers, along with the next book in this series. Just waiting.

Every writer (I think) secretly hopes they’re going to send their book off and get shining, sincere reviews. But the reality is, there is always more work to do. For me, I will be combing through these four edits, and then sending it off to a line editor. Then, and only then, I think I’ll finally be able to say I’m done.

And, of course, the truly scary part starts after that, when I’ll get reviews from people who may or may not like “my baby.”

Indie or Not?

The publishing market today is in a constant state of flux. Things are changing fast, and it can be difficult to keep up.

I recently attended a panel discussion, at the Desert Rose Romance Writers’ Conference, on the different options with publishing. There were six different authors and six different opinions. I thought I would share some of the pros and cons each author mentioned to help others, like myself, navigate this intricate world of publishing.

 

Virginia Nelson

She traditionally published in the past, and with three contracts in her hand decided to self publish.

Advantages: She wanted control over her product.

Disadvantages: She had a lot of research to do on self publishing. She had to initially pay out for her covers, editing and formatting, and self promotion was all on her shoulders.

Vijaya Schartz

She has published several books with small press.

Advantages: They will pay for your editors and bookcovers. Bigger royalties than larger publishing firms.

Disadvantes: No promotion or marketing. No advances.

Advice: Do not put all your eggs in one basket. Small publishers may close their doors. Do not put all your books with one publisher. (Those with a larger publishing firms agreed with this as well.)

Shelly Coriell

Shelly is an award winning author who published her young adult series with Amulet (a bigger New York publisher). She also has an adult suspense series with a different large publishing company.

Advantages: Book advances. Book tours (for her personally, not everyone). They cover all promotion. Great cover art. Three to five different editors to help perfect manuscript.

Disadvantages: No control of tour schedules. Smaller royalties because of advances. Not as much of control of book.

Advice: She was a big proponent of traditional publishing. But she does have a more personal novel that she plans to self publish so that she can have more control.

Erin Quinn

Traditional publishing for over twenty years with some independent publishing as well.

Advantages: Simon and Schuster is her publisher, and she loves their quality editing. Large publishing houses have great marketing as well.

Advice: She does publish novellas independently to supplement her other income.

Jennifer Ashley

She is a New York Times Best Selling author who has been traditionally published since 2002 and began self publishing as well in 2011. Berkley is her current publisher.

Advantages: One of the biggest advantages she discussed was that large publishing houses are able to make the back end deals no one else can. If you want your books in Costco, Walmart, Target, etc. You have to have a large publishing house to sell your books.

Disadvantages: You don’t have as much control of your book with a larger publishing company.

Advice: “Nothing sells your book like your next book” and “Your newsletter is gold.”

 

One piece of advice that several of them gave, was if you choose to go the indie route make your book the best you can. You may want to submit to agents to get feedback even if publishing yourself. Overall, self promotion and lack of professional editors seemed to be the biggest challenge to self publishing. While, lack of control was the biggest disadvantage to tradition publishing.

I hope this helps some of the newer writers out there, or those thinking of making a switch. We have of variety of publishing methods at the swamp and often discuss upcoming trends and issues. Whatever route you choose, do your research and keep asking questions.

I ain’t got no time for cupcakes!

I’ve written two books for NaNoWriMo. Both were ‘wins’ in the NaNo World. I hit 50K words during the month of November, but neither will ever see the light of day.

I love NaNoWriMo because it gave me a win. As a new writer, still wondering if writing was something I could even do, I needed a win. I needed to accomplish…something…but I knew that I wasn’t going to write a best-seller on my first go-round, or second or even third. I needed a goal. Something to shoot for. NaNoWriMo gave me that goal.

I went into them knowing fully well they were practice books. Little foothills on the climb up the slope. Try/fail cycles if you will. I needed to tell myself that yes, I can sit down, start a story, and finish it. I can see a character or two through a journey. Yes it will suck and no, my wife can’t read them because I’m too embarrassed, but they accomplished the intended purpose that I had laid out for them.

So what about this NaNoWriMo? Being my fifth book I’m still dubious that it will be publishable, but I can see a vast improvement in my own writing over the last four to five years. This might be the one, or the next one might be the one. I don’t know, and I don’t much care right now. I do know that I don’t need the ‘win’ like I did in years past, but I still like this time because it’s my ‘winning’ time. It’s become somewhat of a tradition. It also helps that this year I planned on writing a 50K word book…coincidence? I also outlined a ton, more than I’ve ever done before…but more on that next week.

Some things I keep in mind while doing NaNoWriMo:

First off, realize that this month of furious writing is really just a fun way for a bunch of people to get together and get their Great American Novel written. That’s it. Don’t read into it too much. It’s fun.

It’s a tool, one of many, to help schedule your time and focus your energy. Talk to your loved ones, explain your goals and that, even though you might be missing a lot during this time, you’ll be back in December and life will get back to…more normal.

Write. This, obviously, is important. You carved out that time, you’re missing your loved ones, do them proud by actually completing the project. No wasting time on the internet, playing games, etc. Write. Turn off the damned WiFi if you have to.

Don’t edit. Bar yourself from fixing misspelled words if you have to. Yes, to that extreme. I see you hitting backspace to fix that word! Don’t do it!

Your goal is to finish the book. Not fix words or ‘tweak’ anything. This is a chance to actually complete a book. So complete it.

You will have to edit, probably edit a bunch, but you will edit in December and January. Embrace that and be okay with the fact that you might actually say “I don’t know what to put here.” Into your text. Seriously, type that over and over so you don’t break your rhythm. I have done that. It’s amazing what your mind comes up with after writing that line four or five times.

But most of all, have fun. Enjoy it. Relish in the lack of sleep for a month as you pound out 1000 words an hour…You are writing a thousand words an hour aren’t you? Alright mister, time to take the backspace key off your keyboard…

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